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10/16/2006

Winthrop Pianist to Present Recital of New Music

Quick Facts

 Pianist Tomoko Deguchi will perform a recital on Oct. 22 at 4 p.m. in Barnes Recital Hall.
 Deguchi, an assistant professor of music, is a native of Japan.

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Tomoko Deguchi

ROCK HILL, S.C. - Music theorist and pianist Tomoko Deguchi will present a piano recital on Oct. 22 at Winthrop University featuring chamber music written by living composers for Deguchi.  

The recital will be the first installment in an annual series of concerts conceived and initiated by Deguchi, an assistant professor of music at Winthrop and a native of Japan.

The inaugural recital, which will take place in Barnes Recital Hall on Sunday, Oct. 22, at 4 p.m. Included among the pieces featured on the concert is a new work by Ron Parks, an assistant professor and composer at Winthrop. Parks’ work "…drift…" was commissioned by the Force of Nature artist-in-residence program and was written for Deguchi. It premiered at the Force of Nature initial gallery opening at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte on Sept. 20.  

Other works on the recital written for Deguchi include "Freedom Lost" by Bruce Mahin of Radford University, Radford, Va., and "The Hole Through the White Light Shines" by Samuel J. Hamm of Rocky Mountain College in Billings, Mt. In addition, Deguchi will perform "Beautiful Dreamer" by Michigan-based composer Laurel Firant, "Six Chorale Preludes for Solo Piano" (number four is dedicated to Deguchi) by Montreal-based composer Matthew Davidson and "Secrets" by Robert Fleisher.  

The music on the recital represents a wide variety of current styles of piano music. "…drift…" is an example of musical fusion exhibits diverse influences from minimalism to jazz. "Freedom Lost" is based on the composer’s reaction to the events of Sept. 11, 2001, and occasionally utilizes extended techniques. Hamm’s work "The Hole Through Which the White Light Shines" is sparse and focuses on sonority, while "Beautiful Dreamer" is based on the Stephen Foster tune of the same name. Davidson’s "Six Chorale Preludes for Solo Piano" features Bach-like settings of hymn tunes in an array of musical styles. Fleisher’s "Secrets," written in 1974, is the oldest work on the recital and is more modernist in its free treatment of dissonance and integration of aleatoric procedures.

The concert is free and open to the public. For more information, call the Department of Music at 803/323-2255.


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