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08/18/2009

Political Science Professor Will Lead MLA Program

Quick Facts

 Boylan spent the last year as interim chair of the Department of History.
 He looks forward to teaching and shaping MLA curriculum to emphasize a sense of exploration and discovery.

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Tim Boylan

ROCK HILL, S.C. - Tim Boylan, professor of political science, will take on a new role this fall as director of the Master of Liberal Arts Program at Winthrop.
 
Boylan spent the last year as interim chair of the Department of History. He moves into this new role looking forward to teaching and shaping MLA curriculum to emphasize a sense of exploration and discovery.

“The MLA program is uniquely positioned to offer a framework for new, continued, and renewed learning for mature learners and retirees,” Boylan said. “I see the growth and development of the MLA program on a parallel track alongside Winthrop’s long-term plans to offer lifelong learning for a broad range of students.”

Winthrop officials said Boylan is a good fit for the job. "Dr. Boylan's interdisciplinary background, diverse experience, and critical and creative thinking skills make him well-suited to serve as director of the MLA Program.  An excellent teacher, scholar, and administrator, he will be a valuable asset to this growing program,” said Debra Boyd, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Boylan came to Winthrop in 1996 after completing a Ph.D. at Northern Arizona University and a master’s degree in Human Resources Leadership from Azusa Pacific University in California. Along with his MLA duties, Dr. Boylan will continue to teach political science courses.

While his overall education has involved the study of American and global politics, social psychology, and theology, he also has experience working in the criminal justice field, for a non-profit organization and in healthcare. He worked for local corrections department and the regional police academy in northern Florida; assisted for five years with the direction of a feeding, medical, and reconstruction project that serviced a refugee population of 5,000 families who were victims of the 1976 earthquake that devastated Guatemala; and worked as a financial administrator for a multi-physician medical practice. 

He has an international background, holding dual citizenship in the United States and the Republic of Ireland and has traveled to Europe on extended academic projects. This included a sabbatical year and Fulbright scholarship in 2004-05 where he conducted research surrounding the framing and ratification of the European Union’s Constitution. 

In the spring of 2008 he worked as a researcher in residence at the Parliament of the European Union, which enabled him to become part of a parliamentary committee, interact with members of Parliament, and enter into a research project on comparative constitutionalism.


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