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04/05/2009

Funeral Arrangements Announced for Professor and Daughter Killed in Accident

Quick Facts

 Cindy Furr had worked at Winthrop since 2002.
 She loved being a parent, taking care of animals, teaching students and giving kickboxing lessons.

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Cindy Furr
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Outside of Furr's office

ROCK HILL, S.C. - Funeral arrangements have been announced for Dr. Cynthia Furr, assistant professor of English, and her 2-year-old daughter McAllister Price, who died from injuries sustained in a car wreck Saturday evening near the Buster Boyd Bridge on N.C. 49.

Furr's family will receive friends on Wednesday, April 8, from 1-3 p.m. at Pleasant Hill Presbyterian Church in Charlotte, N.C. The funeral will begin at 3 p.m. at Pleasant Hill Church; burial will follow in the church cemetery. At present, the family has made no announcement about memorials. 

A memorial book is available this week outside Furr’s office in Bancroft Hall 254, where students, friends and colleagues can record thoughts and memories. The book will be given to the family. Furr and her daughter's obituary, published in the Charlotte Observer, can be found online.

Furr, 45, and her daughter pulled out of the RiverPointe neighborhood at 6:44 p.m. Saturday, April 4, in their Mercedes when it was struck by a car believed to be drag racing, reported the Charlotte Observer. Furr died at the scene, while her daughter passed away at a Charlotte hospital.

Winthrop officials mourn the loss of a vibrant faculty member, who had worked at Winthrop since 2002. "The Winthrop community is deeply saddened by this senseless and tragic loss of a loving mother and child," said President Anthony DiGiorgio. "Students will miss Cindy as a talented teacher and mentor; faculty and staff have lost a friend and colleague. Our deepest sympathies are extended to all who share in this profound sense of loss."

Furr primarily trained and worked with student interns who wanted to teach English in secondary schools. She initially worked in the Richard W. Riley College of Education for two years, but joined the Department of English in 2004 where she also taught writing and British literature.

"Cindy was a vivacious, passionate woman, who was dedicated to her family, her students, her colleagues, and Winthrop," said Debra Boyd, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. "Cindy became a mother somewhat later in life and was devoted to McAllister, a sweet, adorable, and beautiful child, who attended College of Arts and Sciences faculty meetings and listened attentively as we went about our business. Our world is a lesser place without them."

University College Dean Gloria Jones said Furr touched numerous lives. She got to know Furr 20 years ago when Furr taught Jones' children at Olympic High School in Mecklenburg County, N.C. "Her students at Winthrop were devoted to her because they knew that they were important," Jones said. "She shaped lives."

Sophomore Margo Thermos of Greer, S.C., said Furr pushed her students to do their best work in her British literature class and was not an easy teacher. "She was right there doing the work with us," said Thermos, a middle school education major. "She was dedicated to making us succeed. She talked to us not only about class but about life and how the literature applies to today. She was very refreshing. She was passionate and very strong."

A vocalist, Furr played several instruments and served as choir director at Pleasant Hill Presbyterian Church. A 2005 profile in the Winthrop FYI faculty/staff newsletter recounted her many adventures on her Chester County farm when she kept cows, horses and goats and her travel to the Grand Teton Mountains to dog sled and snowmobile.

Furr held a Ph.D. in English education from the University of South Carolina, a master's degree in administration from Winthrop and a bachelor's degree in English and music from Queens University.

The Charlotte native also taught kickboxing on campus where a generation of students learned about Furr's desire to live life to the fullest.


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