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07/07/2014

Sabbatical Projects Announced for Six Faculty Members

Quick Facts

 Their topics cover a pioneering female photographer, two female abolitionists, Hurricane Katrina survivors, a Spanish textbook, history on Hausa art, and the youthful works of composers Schumann, Brahms and Berg.
 For more information, contact Judy Longshaw, news and media services manager, at longshawj@winthrop.edu.

ROCK HILL, SOUTH CAROLINA – Six Winthrop University faculty members will conduct semester-long sabbaticals for the next academic year.

Their topics cover a pioneering female photographer, two female abolitionists, Hurricane Katrina survivors, a Spanish textbook, history on Hausa art, and the youthful works of composers Schumann, Brahms and Berg.

Here is a closer look:

Donald Friedman, professor of German, fall 2014
His project explores Dora Philippine Kalmus (1881-1960), known as Madame d’Ora and active in Vienna, Berlin and Paris, a pioneering woman photographer of the modernist period and creator of iconic images. Friedman asks: Who was Madame d’Ora, the self-effacing witness behind the lens, herself largely forgotten, but who has left a gallery of defining images of Josephine Baker, Colette, Anna Pavlova, Maurice Chevalier, Alban Berg, Klimt, Tamara de Lempicka and a gallery of intensely creative and glamorous figures?

Amy Gerald, associate professor of English, spring 2015
She will examine new archive materials and expand her writing on Sarah and Angelina Grimke, 19th century abolitionists and women's rights activists from Charleston. She wants to build a sense of public memory about the sisters in South Carolina and determine familial, educational, religious, cultural and social influences that led to their break with the South and eventual public roles in the north.

Jeanne Haubert, associate professor of sociology, fall 2014
She will work as editor on "Survivor Scholars on Hurricane Katrina: A Decade of Disaster Recovery,” a volume that explores issues of race, gender, sexuality and class in the long-term Gulf Coast recovery from Hurricane Katrina. The project brings together local sociologists who were living or working in New Orleans at the time of the hurricane and were personally and professionally affected. Haubert said that large-scale quantitative data analyses help us to understand patterns of recovery, but we also need experiences and insight into the day-to-day lives of survivors over the past 10 years to better understand recovery processes and mechanisms.

Pedro Munoz, professor of Spanish, fall 2014
He will prepare a digital textbook for modern language majors focused on oral communication. He said that by following the most recent pedagogical principles, the book emphasizes practice over formal instruction, prompting students to acquire the target-language in a more “natural way.” The system includes ample internet use, and is thematically organized with infographics.

Alice Burmeister, associate professor of art history, fall 2014
She will complete a monograph covering art history research on Hausa art and aesthetics. The Hausa are the largest ethnic group in West Africa and one of the largest ethnic groups in Africa. They are racially diverse but culturally homogeneous based people primarily in the Sahelian and Sudanian areas of northern Nigeria and southeastern Niger.

Mathew Manwarren, professor of music, fall 2014
He will produce a CD piano recording entitled "Youthful Passion and Fantasy," focusing on the youthful works of musicians Schumann, Brahms and Berg. He plans to record in Oktaven Studios in Yonkers, New York, in October.

For more information, contact Judy Longshaw, news and media services manager, at 803/323-2404 or longshawj@winthrop.edu.

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