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03/11/2014

South African Activist Will Deliver Keynote Address at Model United Nations

Quick Facts

 Naomi Tutu will address the conference at the 6:30 p.m. event in Tillman Auditorium before high school students from nearly 30 North and South Carolina and Georgia schools.
 The Model United Nations participants will be on campus from March 26-28 representing 60+ countries during committee meetings and general session debates.

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Naomi Tutu
ROCK HILL, S.C. - Naomi Tutu, the third child of Archbishop Desmond Tutu, will speak on global development at the March 26 opening address of the 38th annual Model United Nations conference at Winthrop University.

She will address the conference at the 6:30 p.m. event in Tillman Auditorium before high school students from nearly 30 North and South Carolina and Georgia schools. The Model United Nations participants will be on campus from March 26-28 representing 60+ countries during committee meetings and general session debates.

This year’s Model United Nations conference is one of many Inauguration events planned during the last week of March to celebrate Winthrop President Jamie Comstock’s March 28 Investiture Ceremony where she will be formally inaugurated as Winthrop’s 10th president.

Born in South Africa, Naomi Tutu was educated in Swaziland, the United States and England, and has divided her adult life between South Africa and the United States. Growing up as the 'daughter of...' has offered her many opportunities and challenges in her life. She has found her place in the world by raising her voice as a champion for the dignity of all.

During her college years in the 1970s, Tutu was asked to speak at churches, community groups, and colleges and universities about growing up in apartheid South Africa. She has led Truth and Reconciliation Workshops for groups dealing with different types of conflict and co-led workshops on Building Bridges dealing with issues of race and racism. Along with Rose Bator, she is writing a book tentatively titled “I Don't Think of You as Black: Honest Conversations on Race and Racism.”

Tutu’s professional experience ranges from being a development consultant in West Africa to being program coordinator for programs on Race and Gender and Gender-based Violence in Education at the African Gender Institute at the University of Cape Town. In addition, she has taught at the universities of Hartford and Connecticut and at Brevard College in North Carolina.

She is a consultant to two organizations which reflect the breadth of her involvement in issues of human rights – the Spiritual Alliance to Stop Intimate Violence, founded by renowned author Riane Eisler and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Betty Williams, and the Foundation for Hospices in Sub-Saharan Africa (FHSSA).

Winthrop’s first Model U.N. was held on campus under the direction of Melford Wilson, professor of political science, and Alan Rash, the first student coordinator. Since then more than 2,000 Winthrop students and 10,000 high school students have participated in these conferences.

The Winthrop Model U.N. is unique in several ways. It was the first program of its kind to combine participation of college students and high school students. The Winthrop students, who enroll in the United Nations course, are each assigned a country. Throughout the spring semester, the college students study and debate issues commonly discussed in the assemblies of the United Nations.

During conference, these college students act as delegates to the nation they represent, debating a resolution on Wednesday night and assisting the high school delegates of the same nation as they debate resolutions in committees and plenary sessions throughout the conference.

This year’s Secretariat is under the student leadership of Kayla Davis, secretary general; JC Dougherty, director general; and Parker Quinlan, coordinator general.

Here is the Model U.N. schedule:

March 26:
Afternoon registration for high school participants. President Comstock will help greet the high school students during the conference’s opening session. Following the keynote address at 6:30 p.m., the first session of General Assembly will be called to order, and the conference will have officially begun.

March 27: High school students will spend the day in committee sessions debating resolutions that have been previously submitted to the secretary general and the two student coordinators.

March 28: Committee sessions meet again, as well as the General Assembly which meets twice this day, once as a full delegation minus the current Security Council. The afternoon session of General Assembly will be attended by all delegations, including both Security Councils. Following the closing session, awards will be handed out to delegations, delegates and schools.

For more information, please contact Judy Longshaw, news and media services, at longshawj@winthrop.edu or at 803/323-2404.

About Winthrop and the Inauguration of 10th President Jayne Marie Comstock

The March 24-29 Inauguration of Jayne Marie (Jamie) Comstock as Winthrop's 10th president signals a new era in the history of this top-ranked regional public comprehensive university. Comstock has charted a bold course for Winthrop's future, redefining public higher education by prioritizing both quality and access in a single institution. Serving more than 6,000 students, Winthrop blends liberal arts, professional programs, global understanding, and civic engagement in a diverse community of learners. Students leave Winthrop prepared for successful careers, engaged in a democratic society, responsive to local and global concerns, and grounded in values that give meaning to their lives. Comstock's vision for Winthrop will ensure that all students - regardless of demographic category or life experience - have access to an exceptional public higher education. Comporium is the proud presenting sponsor of Inauguration activities.


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