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04/19/2013

Student Captures First Knowles Science Teaching Foundation Fellowship

Quick Facts

 Including Jenkins, only four fellows have been selected out of South Carolina.
 The foundation was established by Janet H. and C. Harry Knowles with the goal of both developing and supporting exemplary science and mathematics high school teachers.

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Sharon Jenkins
ROCK HILL, S.C. — Winthrop University’s Sharon Jenkins has captured a Knowles Science Teaching Foundation Teaching Fellowship, the first in the institution’s history.

As a 2013 Knowles Fellow, Jenkins will be offered support through teaching resources, curriculum materials, research and experts in the field during the five-year program. The foundation was established by Janet H. and C. Harry Knowles with the goal of both developing and supporting exemplary science and mathematics high school teachers. Since 2002, the program has awarded more than 200 fellowships. Including Jenkins, only four fellows have been selected from South Carolina.

“I am excited to be a Knowles Fellow because I will have a network of support for my teaching career that will help me become a better classroom leader and professional educator,” Jenkins said.

Jenkins completed her undergraduate degree in biology from Winthrop in May 2011 and started the traditional Master of Arts in Teaching in biology the following fall. As an undergraduate, Jenkins was a peer mentor and conducted research with Assistant Professor of Chemistry Nicholas Grossoehme. She is also a Winthrop Initiative for STEM Educators (WISE) Scholar and a graduate assistant in her college’s office. 

Jenkins and senior mathematics major Matthew Neal made it to the final round of the program application process. They traveled to Philadelphia last month with approximately 70 other candidates for in-person interviews. Neal will graduate this May as a member of the Honors program and start work on the MAT5 program. Jenkins will graduate in December 2013.

“This national recognition is certainly well deserved,” said Beth Costner, associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and chair and associate professor in the Department of Mathematics. “Winthrop certainly has exceptional students, and I am so happy that these two represented us on this national stage. Both have made an impact at Winthrop, and I am confident they will continue to do so as they move to the next stages in their education and careers.”

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