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01/16/2013

Proposed Art for LYNX Blue Line Extension Highlights Professors' Works

Quick Facts

 Tom Stanley and Shaun Cassidy are featured in the LYNX Blue Line Extension art project.
 An opening reception is scheduled for today at 5:30 p.m. at the Storrs Building Gallery in Charlotte.
 The exhibit will remain at the Storrs Building until Feb. 28, when it will move to the Innovation Institute at McColl Center for Visual Art from March 8-30.

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Tom Stanley
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Shaun Cassidy
ROCK HILL, S.C. — Two Winthrop University professors were selected out of hundreds to integrate public art into the LYNX Blue Line Extension Project. Now through March 30, their proposed art will be on display as a part of the LYNX Blue Line Extension Art Exhibition.

The exhibition, which opened Jan. 14, features art from Tom Stanley, chair of the Department of Fine Arts and Shaun Cassidy, associate professor of fine arts. An opening reception will be held from 5:30-7:30 p.m. on Jan. 16 in the Storrs Building Gallery in Charlotte, located at 9201 University City Boulevard. The reception is open to the public.

Cassidy said the application process was very competitive. He and Stanley, along with 14 other artists, were chosen to design integrated public art that would be included in the light rail stations and system. The exhibition will be the public’s first glance at the proposed art. The Blue Line Extension will begin at 9th Street in Center City, continue through the North Davidson neighborhood and end at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte Campus.

This opportunity arose through an ongoing collaboration with Cassidy, Stanley explained. The two began collaborating in 2006 and applied for the CATS project in 2009.

“Though we originally applied for the Blue Line Extension as a team, we are now working on two separate stations,” he said. “We divided stations so they each have distinct features.”

Cassidy is working on the McCullough station while Stanley is working on the Tom Hunter station. Stanley worked with students at Hidden Valley Elementary School and Martin Luther King Middle School in Charlotte, and he said their ideas will be a significant part of the art at his station.

The exhibit will remain at the Storrs Building until Feb. 28, when it will move to the Innovation Institute at McColl Center for Visual Art from March 8-30.

The exhibition is sponsored by the CATS Art-in-Transit program with support from the Innovation Institute, McColl Center for Visual Art and the UNC Charlotte College of Arts + Architecture.

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