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11/02/2012

Chemistry Students Met With American Chemical Society President in Charlotte

Quick Facts

 Chemistry majors Emily Amenson of Lugoff, S.C., Amy Moore of Fort Mill, S.C., and Destinee Johnson of Anderson, S.C., attended the keynote lecture delivered by Dr. Bassam Shakhashiri, a chemistry professor at University of Wisconsin-Madison and the current president of the American Chemical Society.
 Each student was able to explain her research to Shakhashiri and to others during poster presentations. The three were accompanied by Nick Grossoehme, assistant professor of chemistry.

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Bassam Shakhashiri 
ROCK HILL, S.C. - Three Winthrop University students met and presented their undergraduate research results to one of the academic giants of chemistry teaching Oct. 18 during the 10th anniversary of the Charlotte Area Science Network.

Chemistry majors Emily Amenson of Lugoff, S.C., Amy Moore of Fort Mill, S.C., and Destinee Johnson of Anderson, S.C., attended the keynote lecture delivered by Dr. Bassam Shakhashiri, a chemistry professor at University of Wisconsin-Madison and the current president of the American Chemical Society. Known for promoting the exploration and establishment of links between science, the arts and the humanities, Shakhashiri discussed a number of important contemporary global scientific issues during his lecture.

Amenson said meeting Shakhashiri was the equivalent of meeting a rock star. "His work on teaching children about science and chemistry was exceptionally inspiring for me," she said. "This experience has taught me that being able to understand chemistry is only half the battle; the ability to lead and teach others about chemistry is the more important task."

Johnson said she felt equally privileged for the opportunity to meet Shakhashiri. "I believe that he has served the society beyond the expectations of the entire scientific community during his term," she said. "Extending the invitation to meet with my peers and me after his official duties were over was a true testament of his character."

Moore also found it very inspiring to have the opportunity to meet and talk to Shakhashiri about his love of chemistry. "I truly appreciated him taking time out of his busy schedule to sit down with us and discuss the wonders of chemistry," Moore said. "By spending this time with him I was able to see how and why he has contributed so greatly to the chemistry world. I will take his words of inspiration on to my future chemistry classroom and use them to help engage and energize the next generation of chemistry.

Each student was able to explain her research to Shakhashiri and to others during poster presentations. The three were accompanied by Nick Grossoehme, assistant professor of chemistry. Photos of the three are below:

Emily Amenson (Dr. Lammi mentor) Alzheimer's Disease research http://chem.winthrop.edu/faculty/grossoehme/link_to_webpages/Video%20Files/Photos/IMG_0011.JPG

Destinee Johnson (Dr. Grossoehme mentor) Metal-Protein Interactions research http://chem.winthrop.edu/faculty/grossoehme/link_to_webpages/Video%20Files/Photos/IMG_0012.JPG

Amy Moore (Dr. Grossoehme mentor) Chemical Education research http://chem.winthrop.edu/faculty/grossoehme/link_to_webpages/Video%20Files/Photos/IMG_0015.JPG

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