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01/23/2012

Indian Artist and Students' Work Displayed at Winthrop Galleries

Quick Facts

 The “Undergraduate Juried Exhibition,” to be shown in the Rutledge Gallery, will showcase the works of Winthrop’s fine arts and design students from a variety of disciplines.
 Drawing upon her personal experiences of travelling from her native India to other geographical regions, Nayar-Gall’s exhibition reflects her thoughts on migration, identity, loss, memory and displacement.

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“Conjoined Opposites”
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S.C. Schools Photography Exhibition sample
ROCK HILL, S.C. - The “24th Annual Undergraduate Juried Exhibition” and “Conjoined Opposites” by Indrani Nayar-Gall open at Winthrop University Galleries Feb. 13 and will run until March 30.

The “Undergraduate Juried Exhibition,” to be shown in the Rutledge Gallery, will showcase the works of Winthrop’s fine arts and design students from a variety of disciplines. This year’s juror was Karen Ann Myers, assistant director at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art, in Charleston, S.C. The opening reception for both exhibitions and awards ceremony for the “Undergraduate Juried Exhibition” will be held on Feb. 10, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Rutledge and Patrick Galleries.

In the Elizabeth Dunlap Patrick Gallery is “Conjoined Opposites” by artist Indrani Nayar-Gall. Drawing upon her personal experiences of travelling from her native India to other geographical regions, Nayar-Gall’s exhibition reflects her thoughts on migration, identity, loss, memory and displacement. By combining two dimensional with three dimension and time-based media; color with absence of color; perfect forms of spheres with deformed or organic; prickly hard with soft flesh-like yarns; smooth transparent with opaque and menacing, her work attempts to understand the paradox of conjoined opposites, the fear/trauma/sadness/loss/death with hope/dream of life that exist within all of us.

Additionally, Nayar-Gall’s shift from personal to global narratives is explored, either examining stories of loss and displacement in social and political contexts, or the ability of the displaced to mend these opposites within themselves.

In conjunction with her exhibition, and continuing with the theme of displacement, Nayar-Gall will install an interactive piece, “Losing Dawn,” in the DiGiorgio Campus Center. This piece will be unveiled on Feb. 28 as part of a global learning event, “Transformative Art & Activism in a Global Context,” which will start in the main lobby of the DiGiorgio Center at 8 p.m.

This event will begin with a performance by Cyrus Art Productions, “Middle Passage Part I: Traveler,” which focuses on the shifting location of black culture and the concept of the “other” within our society. Following this performance, Nayar-Gall will unveil “Losing Dawn” and speak about her work in Dina’s Place, also located in the DiGiorgio Center. This event is sponsored in part by the Women’s Studies Committee, the Department of Theatre and Dance, and a grant from the Global Learning Initiative.

Also showing through February and March in the Lewandowski Student Gallery is the “2012 South Carolina Schools Photography Exhibition” running Jan. 30-Feb. 10 with an awards reception Feb. 4 at noon. The “Foundations Exhibition” will run Feb. 20-March 2 and the “Sculpture/Drawing Exhibition” will run March 12-23.

Winthrop University Galleries hours are Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., and closed on weekends and university holidays. All artist talks, exhibitions and receptions are free and open to the public.

For more information, call the Galleries at 803/323-2493 or e-mail Karen Derksen, Galleries director, at derksenk@winthrop.edu. Follow the Galleries online on Facebook or Twitter. 

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