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10/10/2011

Area Archeologist Talks about Finds at Darlington County Site

Quick Facts

 As part of S.C. Archeology Month, Winthrop University will host a lecture entitled “Fifteen Years of Archeology and Education at the Johannes Kolb Site” on Thursday, Oct. 14, at 5:30 p.m. in Kinard Auditorium.
 Chris Judge, an instructor of anthropology and assistant director of Native American Studies at USC Lancaster, will discuss the archeological and educational successes to date related to the Johannes Kolb Archaeological and Education Project.

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Chris Judge
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ROCK HILL, S.C. - An 18th century spoon – a wedding gift or a family heirloom? A 19th century pair of scissors – used during childbirth? These are questions that Chris Judge and a team of volunteers are trying to answer about recent artifacts unearthed at the Johannes Kolb Site.

As part of S.C. Archeology Month, Winthrop University will host a lecture entitled “Fifteen Years of Archeology and Education at the Johannes Kolb Site” on Thursday, Oct. 13, at 5:30 p.m. in Kinard Auditorium.

Judge, an instructor of anthropology and assistant director of Native American Studies at USC Lancaster, will discuss the archeological and educational successes to date related to the Johannes Kolb Archaeological and Education Project.

Since 1996, archaeological excavations and public programs have been undertaken at the Johannes Kolb site located on a sandy knoll in the middle of the Pee Dee River swamp in Darlington County. A joint effort of the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, Diachronic Research Foundation and University of South Carolina Lancaster, the site’s work has been conducted largely by volunteers who spend their time digging for artifacts or sifting and washing any unearthed pieces.

Spanning from the Ice Age until very recent times, evidence from Native, African and Euro American occupations abounds at the site. Systematic excavations across the one and one-half acre site have produced nearly 200,000 artifacts.

“Perhaps the greatest challenge to archeologists is successfully relaying the nuances of our discipline to a broad audience,” said Judge. “In order to be successful we must try and make the mute artifacts talk. The Johannes Kolb site provides a unique opportunity to dovetail archaeological research with a concerted public education program.”

For more information about the lecture, please contact Judge at judgec@sc.edu or Christina Brooks, instructor of sociology and anthropology at Winthrop, at brooksc@winthrop.edu.

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