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04/25/2011

Winthrop Poll Results Show Opinions of S.C. Registered Voters

Quick Facts

 For the Winthrop Poll, the opinions of 1,363 registered voters in South Carolina were taken between April 17-23.
 Results which use all respondents have a margin of error of +/- 2.65% at the 95% confidence level. Reported results using a subset of the entire sample will naturally have a higher margin of error.

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Scott Huffmon 

ROCK HILL, S.C. - The Winthrop Poll results of S.C. registered voters reveals opinions about Congress, Obama's job performance, the Tea Party Movement and entitlement programs.

For the Winthrop Poll, the opinions of 1,363 registered voters in South Carolina were taken between April 17-23, according to Scott Huffmon, poll director and associate professor of political science. Results which use all respondents have a margin of error of +/- 2.65% at the 95% confidence level. Reported results using a subset of the entire sample will naturally have a higher margin of error.

The majority of questions, however, were only asked of Republicans and Independents who lean Republican (previous research has shown that leaners often behave in a more consistently partisan manner than weak party identifiers). These results come from 589 Republicans and Republican leaners in SC who are also registered to vote and have a margin of error of +/- 4.04% at the 95% confidence level. Reported results using a subset of the entire sample will naturally have a higher margin of error. Phone calls were made during weekday evenings, all day Saturday, and Sunday afternoon and evening. For further explanation of methodology, click here.

Among the Winthrop Poll findings — keeping in mind that since campaigning has not really begun, the results dealing with the 2012 election must be considered as preliminary numbers:

• Despite the fact that Republicans recently reclaimed the majority in the House, among Republicans, 78.5% said they disapproved of the way Congress is doing its job.

• When asked about Barack Obama’s job performance as president, 43.4% of all respondents approved, while 47.4% disapproved. Independents—whom many cite as a key factor in the 2012 election—disapproved by 55%.

• Among Republicans, those who were asked who they thought the eventual 2012 Republican nominee would be, regardless of the one they currently supported, named Mitt Romney most frequently—by 21.4% of respondents. The second most-frequently named was Mike Hukabee, with 8.3% — however, 47.4% said they weren’t sure.

• Among Republicans, 64% said they did not consider themselves members of the Tea Party movement, but three-out-of-four said they generally agreed with the party’s principles.

• Among Republicans, 56% said that it was more important to select a Republican presidential nominee who matched their beliefs, while 32.4% said it was more important to select a candidate who could beat Obama in 2012.

• Among Republicans who are currently receiving Social Security or Medicare benefits, 69% said they would NOT be willing to have those benefits reduced to address the national budget concerns. Republicans not yet receiving those benefits were almost evenly divided, with 42.2% saying they WOULD be willing and 48.3% saying they WOULD NOT.

To read the questions and answers, click here. 

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NOTE:
**The margin of error for data using all respondents is +/- 2.65%. Results using a subset of all respondents will naturally have a higher margin of error.


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