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07/22/2010

Education Faculty Member Wins Award for William Barton Rogers Book

Quick Facts

 Published by Johns Hopkins University Press, the book is titled “William Barton Rogers and the Idea of MIT.”
 "William Barton Rogers and the Idea of MIT" focuses on Rogers and his efforts to establish the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, one of America's premier higher-education learning institutions.

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A.J. Angulo

RICHMOND, Va. - The Virginia Historical Society recently presented its 2009 Richard Slatten Prize for Excellence in Virginia Biography to Winthrop University faculty member A.J. Angulo for his book on William Barton Rogers, a nineteenth-century Virginia scientist. 

Published by Johns Hopkins University Press, the book is titled “William Barton Rogers and the Idea of MIT.” 

The award was announced July 21 at a Virginia Historical Society board of trustees luncheon in Richmond, Va. It has been given since 1998, thanks to a generous bequest from the estate of Kathleen L. Slatten to recognize distinguished contributions to Virginia biography. 

A member of the Virginia Historical Society Slatten Prize selection committee said, “A.J. Angulo’s well-written and clearly argued prose not only told Rogers’s story in an engaging manner but also placed it in the context of the larger themes of science and education in 19th-century America. Angulo’s biography was the clear choice to receive this prestigious award from the Virginia Historical Society.”

This is the second award for Angulo, whose book also captured the History of Education Society’s Outstanding Book Award for 2009.
 
"William Barton Rogers and the Idea of MIT" focuses on Rogers and his efforts to establish the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), one of America's premier higher-education learning institutions. In the book, Angulo also examines the ways that Rogers revolutionized standard educational practices of his time by designing a curriculum of specialized scientific study, a model used today in academic institutions worldwide. Due to the amount of extensive archival research required, Angulo's book took several years to complete.
 
Angulo, an associate professor in Winthrop’s Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy, earned an M.Ed. at the University of Georgia and another master's degree and his doctorate at Harvard University, where he was a research assistant and a Teaching Fellow in history of education and history of science. The Wichita, Kan., native came to Winthrop in fall 2003, and he teaches classes on the social, legal and philosophical dimensions of America's education.

For more information, contact Angulo at 803/323-4294 or anguloa@winthrop.edu.


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