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Undergraduate Catalog

Degree Requirements

Each student is responsible for meeting requirements for graduation as stated in the University Catalog. An adviser is available for counsel, but the responsibility remains with the student.

The baccalaureate degrees require the completion of a minimum of 124 semester hours of credit, including all courses required in the specified degree program, with a final grade-point average of 2.00 or better on all courses which are taken on a letter-grade basis at Winthrop University. Students must also achieve a minimum of a 2.00 GPA in courses counted toward the major and minor programs. Some degree programs have more stringent GPA requirements. See degree program listings for specific requirements.

Of those semester hours required for the baccalaureate degree, a minimum of 40 semester hours must be in courses numbered above 299, and 46-58 semester hours must be distributed in accordance with the Touchstone Program (general education) Distribution Requirements and the Touchstone Core:

Not more than 36 semester hours in any one subject designator may be applied toward the major for a Bachelor of Arts degree. A student may elect to apply up to an additional 6 semester hours in the same subject designator toward general electives, Touchstone program (general education) distribution requirements, or a minor with the exception of the social sciences minor, unless limited by the major program. All baccalaureate degree programs at Winthrop University require the successful completion of the Touchstone Core.

A student not majoring in Business Administration may take for the baccalaureate degree a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit in the College of Business Administration. Programs permitting more than 30 semester hours of such courses must be approved by the Dean of the College of Business Administration. Each program leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree requires the completion of a minor in addition to the major program. Students must achieve a 2.00 grade-point average in courses counted toward the minor. Students may fulfill the minor requirements with one or more minors of their own choosing or a second major. Students in Bachelor of Science degree programs may elect to complete a minor. The minimum number of semester hours required for a minor is 15, at least 6 of which must be in courses above 299. Bachelor of Science degree students may use courses required in the major to also satisfy minor requirements, except those pursuing a B.S. in Business Administration. No course may count toward a business administration major and a business administration minor. Minors are recorded on the permanent record.

Students may elect a second major. When doing so, students must indicate which college they wish to have advise them, and it shall be the student’s responsibility to ascertain whether the appropriate requirements have been met in both majors. The second major shall be recorded on the permanent record in lieu of, or in addition to, a minor. It should be noted that a double major will not by itself lead to the conferral of a second degree.

The Touchstone Program: Distinctive General Education at Winthrop University

In order to create an academic environment in which students use their talents to achieve excellence, take responsibility for the integrity and quality of their own work, and engage in meaningful practices that prepare them to fulfill their obligations as students in an academic community and as responsible global and local citizens, the faculty developed the Touchstone Program at Winthrop University, our distinctive general education experience. The Touchstone Program captures the dynamic quality of Winthrop’s academic environment that provides students with a framework for learning and responsible decision-making that they will use throughout their lives.

The Touchstone Core

The Touchstone Core (ACAD 101, WRIT 101, HMXP 102, CRTW 201), collectively forms the basis of deeper learning and academic progress. The courses in the Core will acquaint students with academic writing and critical thinking and will build capacities that students will use throughout their university experience and their adult lives. Beginning students should enroll in WRIT 101 during their first semester at Winthrop University and should complete WRIT 101, HMXP 102, and CRTW 201 early in their academic careers. Students who do not pass these courses with grades of C- or better by the time they have completed 75 earned hours will be limited to a maximum course load of 12 hours per semester and will not be permitted to enroll in courses above 299 until they have satisfied these requirements.

 

An education at Winthrop University will produce graduates who will recognize the importance of the following and will aspire to these educational ideals:

Goal One: To communicate clearly and effectively in standard English.

To achieve this goal, students should:

  1. Read, write, and speak standard English.
  2. Analyze written, spoken, and nonverbal messages from a variety of disciplines; and
  3. Understand and practice rhetorical techniques and styles by writing and by giving oral presentations
Goal Two: To acquire and appreciate quantitative skills.

To achieve this goal, students should:

  1. Solve mathematical problems of the type necessary for living in today’s and tomorrow’s world;
  2. Make valid inferences from data;
  3. Understand that quantitative analysis is important to almost every endeavor of humankind; and 
  4. Understand the concept and application of quantitative relationships.
Goal Three: To use critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and a variety of research methods.

To achieve this goal, students should:

  1. Identify sound and unsound reasoning;
  2. Analyze and use a variety of information gathering techniques; 
  3. Conduct independent research; 
  4. Use computers competently; and 
  5. Use the library and other information sources competently.
Goal Four: To recognize and appreciate human diversity (both past and present) as well as the diversity of ideas, institutions, philosophies, moral codes, and ethical principles.

To achieve this goal, students should:

  1. Analyze diverse world cultures, societies, languages, historical periods and artistic expressions.
  2. Understand cultures in their own terms and in terms of the diversity of ideas, institutions, philosophies, moral codes, and ethical principles; and,
  3. Understand the nature of social and cultural conflict and methods of resolution
Goal Five: To understand scientific knowledge in terms of its methods or acquisition, its specific quantitative nature, and its dynamic and contingent character.

To achieve this goal, students should:

  1. Study areas of science that may affect everyday life; 
  2. Identify and develop hypotheses, design studies, and collect data in light of these hypotheses; 
  3. Take accurate measurements and make detailed observations to reach valid empirical conclusions; and 
  4. Understand how scientific theories change over time.
Goal Six: To understand aesthetic values, the creative process, and the interconnectedness of the literary, visual, and performing arts throughout the history of civilization.

To achieve this goal, students should:

  1. Participate in and/or observe a variety of artistic expressions; 
  2. Study the discipline and techniques involved in artistic creations; and 
  3. Understand how and why people use artistic form.
Goal Seven: To examine values, attitudes, beliefs, and habits which define the nature and quality of life.

To achieve this goal, students should:

  1. Reflect on the role played in their lives by school, work, leisure, and community involvement; 
  2. Examine problems, issues, and choices that confront citizens of the world; 
  3. Pursue basic principles of wellness; 
  4. Take responsibility for the consequences of their actions and choices; and 
  5. Articulate and assess their personal ethical principles.

Touchstone Program Distribution Requirements 

View full listing of the Touchstone Program Distribution Requirements (Winthrop's distinctive general education requirements).

 

University Level Competencies


All candidates for a baccalaureate degree shall complete the General Education Distribution Requirements. Although these requirements usually take the form of individual courses, students should integrate their learning experiences from different courses taken at different times and should assimilate common concepts taught in different disciplines. Students should conduct all activities in an ethical manner and work with integrity and honesty toward the goals below. Courses through the Touchstone Program and the student’s major and minor (if appropriate) will prepare students for mastery of the following University Level Competencies, competencies that will prepare students for careers and living beyond their studies at Winthrop:

Competency 1: Winthrop graduates think critically and solve problems.
Winthrop University graduates reason logically, evaluate and use evidence, and solve problems. They seek out and assess relevant information from multiple viewpoints to form well-reasoned conclusions. Winthrop graduates consider the full context and consequences of their decisions and continually reexamine their own critical thinking process, including the strengths and weaknesses of their arguments.

Competency 2: Winthrop graduates are personally and socially responsible.
Winthrop University graduates value integrity, perceive moral dimensions, and achieve excellence. They take seriously the perspectives of others, practice ethical reasoning, and reflect on experiences. Winthrop graduates have a sense of responsibility to the broader community and contribute to the greater good.

Competency 3: Winthrop graduates understand the interconnected nature of the world and the time in which they live.
Winthrop University graduates comprehend the historical, social, and global contexts of their disciplines and their lives. They also recognize how their chosen area of study is inextricably linked to other fields. Winthrop graduates collaborate with members of diverse academic, professional, and cultural communities as informed and engaged citizens.

Competency 4: Winthrop graduates communicate effectively.
Winthrop University graduates communicate in a manner appropriate to the subject, occasion, and audience. They create texts – including but not limited to written, oral, and visual presentations – that convey content effectively. Mindful of their voice and the impact of their communication, Winthrop graduates successfully express and exchange ideas.

Residence Requirements

There are four basic residence requirements:

  1. A minimum of 25% course credits required for a degree (31 hours in a 124-hour program) must be taken within five calendar years preceding the date the degree is granted.
  2. A minimum of 22 of the final 31 hours required for the degree must be taken in residence at Winthrop exclusive of CLEP credit. However, a minimum of 15 is required if the student participates in a recognized exchange program at Winthrop University. This exception will require the approval of the Winthrop director of the exchange program, the head of the student’s department, and the director of student services in the college of the student’s major. 
  3. When part of the final hours is taken at another institution, the student must have taken a minimum of 30 semester hours at Winthrop prior to taking the final 31 hours. The institution and the course taken must be satisfactory to the student’s adviser and to the dean of the college. 
  4. A minimum of 12 semester hours of course credits must be taken in residence at Winthrop in the major discipline(s).

In meeting the residence requirements, credits earned during the Winthrop summer session are counted on the same basis as credits earned in the fall and spring semesters. In addition to the basic residence requirements for all Winthrop undergraduate degrees, all undergraduate degree programs in the College of Business Administration require that the final 31 hours required for the degree must be taken in residence at Winthrop.

Course Level Requirement

For graduation with a baccalaureate degree a student must present a minimum of 40 semester hours in courses numbered above 299 (48 semester hours above 299 in programs offered by the College of Business Administration).

Final Grade-Point Average

A final cumulative grade-point average of 2.00 or better is required for graduation. The final grade-point average is based on the hours and quality points earned for all courses taken on a letter-grade basis at Winthrop. Freshman Year Seminar: Principles of the Learning Academy The freshman year seminar course, Principles of the Learning Academy (ACAD 101) is required for all first-time entering freshmen. The goals of this course are to introduce first-year students to the concepts, resources, and skills necessary for successful higher learning and to facilitate the student’s adjustment to and engagement in the class and university. ACAD 101 carries one hour of credit. Classes generally meet twice a week in small groups with a seminar director and peer mentor the first part of the semester.

Cultural Events Requirement

By graduation, each undergraduate student, who began at Winthrop as a Freshman, is required to attend three cultural events for every 20 hours completed at Winthrop University, not to exceed a maximum requirement of 18 cultural events. Transfer students will be required to attend three cultural events for every 20 hours needed to reach 124 hours. For example, a student bringing in 30 hours of accepted transfer credit would be required to complete 13 cultural events. (The minimum number is four as students must complete a minimum 25% of course credits at Winthrop required for the degree.) The purpose of the cultural events requirement is to establish and foster a life-enriching pattern of cultural involvement.

Each semester a calendar of events which have been approved as fulfilling the cultural events requirement is published. This calendar will have events added over the course of the semester. Events that are selected will be chosen from areas such as plays, films, art exhibitions, and dance and musical performances, or from lectures of general appeal. Students may fulfill this requirement through any one of the following three methods or a combination of these methods:

  1. Attend approved on-campus events. To receive credit the student must be scanned both in and out of the event. 
  2. Petition for credit for attendance at an event off-campus. This option requires a petition form (available from the Cultural Events Office, the Registration Office or the Winthrop Web Site), proof of attendance (ticket stub or program), and a one-page typewritten report.
  3. Present a portfolio of culturally related life experiences. All experiences cited must be post-high school and prior to matriculation at Winthrop University. This option is designed for the nontraditional student with extensive cultural experiences.

For more detailed information regarding the Cultural Events Requirement and/or these three options, visit the Cultural Events website at http://www.winthrop.edu/culturalevents/ or contact the Office of Records and Registration, 126 Tillman.

Double Majors/Dual Degrees

A student may obtain a double major within the 124 hours required for a baccalaureate degree by completing requirements for two majors with the same degree (e.g., BA Political Science and BA History). Selection of two majors representing different degrees (e.g. BS Biology and BA Psychology) leads to a dual degree. A student may obtain a dual degree by completing the requirements for both majors including at least 30 hours beyond the 124 hours required for the first degree.

Second Baccalaureate Degree

A graduate of the University may receive a second baccalaureate degree if it is in a different major by fulfilling the following conditions:

  1. Meet all the requirements for the second degree.*
  2. Complete a minimum of 30 hours in residence beyond requirements for the first degree.

*The dean of the appropriate college will determine the courses required to complete the second degree. Cultural Events are not required for the second degree.

Students wishing to complete a second degree concurrently with their first undergraduate degree must meet all requirements for the second degree and complete 30 credit hours beyond the requirements for the first degree.