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College of Arts and Sciences

College of Arts and Sciences

Faculty Profile

 
title 
 Quick, Sarah   Name:  Sarah Quick 
Title:  Adjunct Instructor of Anthropology 
Education:
Ph.D., Social-Cultural Anthropology (minor in Ethnomusicology), Indiana University
M.A., Anthropology, University of Missouri-Columbia
B.A., University of South Carolina
Office:  336 Kinard Hall  
Phone:  803/323-4649 
E-mail:  quicks@winthrop.edu  
Web:   
Area(s):
Native Peoples of North America: Métis Culture and History, Alberta Native Organizations, Canadian and U.S. Federal Policies toward Indigenous Populations, Plains Culture Area, Cree Culture and History, Mixed-Heritage Identities, Powwow, Southeastern Native Peoples; Performance Studies: Music/Dance, Festivals, Ethnomusicology, Revival, Ritual, Pilgrimage, Identity and Representation: Nationalism, Racial Constructions, Heritage Industry, Media Consumption, Ethnographic Film, Gender Studies, Film Studies, Food Studies: Slow and Local Foods Movements, Landrace and Heirloom Seed-Saving, Sustainable Farming, Southern Heritage Food
In the fall of 2009 she began a new line of research on local slow foods movements conjoining with an interest in preserving southern food ways mainly in Columbia, S.C. She began by interviewing the creator of Anson Mills, which is an operation that contracts organic farmers in order to preserve historical grains and promote sustainable farming practices. Grits being their most famous product, Anson Mills straddles seemingly contradictory poles in emphasizing historical and localized farming knowledge while selling to high-end consumers in global market settings. Of late, Quick has become a more active participant in the local Slow Foods chapter and has interviewed others contracted as "seedsmen" for Anson Mills as well as those involved in offering local foods at farmers’ markets and local restaurants. Recently she has connected her ethnomusicology background to this food research, considering the relationship between musical and food subcultures since it was through involvement in a local band that she became reacquainted with those active in the local and slow food movement.