community

The Windows Project

Latest NSSE Results

The Reading Tent Project

 

Winthrop continues to develop rewarding partnerships in the community through a variety of measures. A campus-wide focus on collaboration and service learning has been a constant since the university’s founding. Valuable collaborations in 2011-12 include:

The Windows Project Installation at Wells Fargo Championship 

Wells Fargo Bank commissioned eight installations from nine sculpture students to serve as public art at the 2012 Wells Fargo Championship, a PGA TOUR golf tournament held in Charlotte, N.C., in spring 2012. The collaboration marked the first in the tournament’s 10-year history. Known as the Windows Project, the sculptures were set into steel arched window frames and embodied several themes. This unique opportunity allowed students to work within the parameters of a creative public art installation that is typically reserved for professional artists, an experience that proved invaluable to the students.

Latest NSSE Results

Freshmen and seniors gave Winthrop high marks in the 2011 results of the National Survey of Student Engagement’s “Fostering Student Engagement Campuswide.” The survey emphasizes the idea of effective teaching and student learning. More than 600 students were surveyed, with 93 percent of freshmen saying they had a favorable image of Winthrop while 83 percent of seniors said they would attend Winthrop again if they could repeat their college experience. Other survey highlights included students saying: the university substantially emphasizes academics; faculty members are available, helpful and sympathetic; and more than 90 percent of seniors have discussed career plans with faculty.

The Reading Tent Project

Freshmen completed the first year of “The Reading Tent Project,” a shared community service project dedicated to improving childhood literacy. The Center for Career and Civic Engagement coordinated the five-year initiative, which was inspired by Book Aid International’s Reading Tent Program. Teams of students collected donated children’s books and raised money to buy new ones. They raised approximately $40,000 from the books and cash donations. Students also hosted their own reading tent, where they invited children to read for fun, and facilitated literacy games during visits to local elementary schools and community centers. Each child received a free book, courtesy of the effort.

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